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Dutch: The Most Basic Phrases

Useful words and phrases for when you're visiting Holland. Many people in Holland speak some English, but it's a nice courtesy to say a few Dutch words.
Hi, hello Hallo click to hear
My name is ... Ik heet ... click to hear
My name is ... Mijn naam is ... click to hear
Hi - I am Marco Hallo, ik ben Marco click to hear
Hi - my name is Marco Hallo, ik heet Marco click to hear
My name is Daniel Mijn naam is Daniël click to hear
What's your name?
polite: Wat is Uw naam? click to hear 2
informal: Hoe heet je? click to hear
Common First and Last Names
Mr. and Sir Meneer click to
      hear
( = Mijnheer)
Mr. van Dijk Meneer van Dijk click to
      hear
Mrs. and Ma'am Mevrouw click to
      hear Mrs. Jansen Mevrouw Jansen click to
      hear
Miss Juffrouw click to
      hear
(old-fashioned)
Miss de Jong Juffrouw de Jong click to
      hear
Ladies and Gentlemen ...
(addressing a group)
Dames en Heren ... click to
      hear 2
Allow me to introduce myself ... 'Mag ik me even voorstellen?' click to hear 2
Good morning Goedemorgen click to
      hear
Good afternoon Goedemiddag click to
      hear
Good evening Goedenavond click to
      hear
Goodbye, See you Tot ziens click to hear
See you in a moment Tot zo click to
      hear 2
See you later Tot straks click to hear 2
See you this afternoon Tot vanmiddag click to
      hear
See you this evening Tot vanavond click to hear
See you tomorrow Tot morgen click to hear 2
see you Monday Tot maandag click to hear
How are you? (polite) Hoe maakt U het? click to hear
How are you? (informal)
Hoe gaat 't? click to
      hear
Hoe is 't ermee? click to hear
Very good, thank you Heel goed, dank je click to
      hear 2 >>
And you? En met jou? click to
      hear
Please Alstublieft click to hear
Thank you (polite) Dank U wel click to hear
Thank you (informal) Dank je wel click to hear
Bedankt! click to hear
Thank you, and the same to you Bedankt en van hetzelfde click to hear 2
You're welcome, My pleasure Graag gedaan click to hear
No Problem ('Minimal effort')
Don't mention it ('no reason to thank me')
Kleine moeite click to
      hear
Geen dank click to hear
It doesn't matter 't Geeft niet click to
      hear 2
Excuse me Pardon click to hear (French)
Just a moment, please
just a moment ...
Een momentje, alstublieft click to hear
ogenblikje click to hear 2
Wait a moment ... Wacht even click to hear 2
I'm sorry Het spijt me click to
      hear 2 (sorry click to hear)
Best wishes Het beste ermee click to hear
Have fun Veel plezier click to
      hear
Have a nice day Een prettige dag nog click to
      hear
Have a nice weekend Prettig weekend click to
      hear 2
Bon Appetit (Enjoy your meal)
Cheers!
Eet smakelijk click to hear - >>
Proost! click to hear 2
Have a safe & pleasant trip Goede reis click to hear - >>
Sleep well, Happy dreams Welterusten click to
      hear
What's going on? Wat is er aan de hand? click to
      hear
What's the price? Wat is de prijs? click to hear 2 - >>
Ouch! Au! click to hear
Help me! Help! click to hear 2 - >>
Where is the bathroom?
Gents
Ladies
Waar is de WC? click to hear 2
Heren (old-fashioned: Heeren)
Dames
Bless you! (Gesundheit!)
(what you say when somebody sneezes click to hear)
Gezondheid! click to
      hear
Get well (Wishing you a speedy recovery) Beterschap click to hear - >>
In Holland, people don't say something like "How are you?" to about everyone you come across, like in America. Just say it to people you already know.
Next to Heel goed, dank je click to
      hear 2 (Very good, thank you) other possible answers to Hoe gaat 't? click to hear ("How are you?") are: goed click to hear 2 ('good') - redelijk click to hear ('reasonably, relatively well') - 't gaat wel click to hear 2 3 ('not so bad, hanging in there') - niet zo goed click to hear ('not so good') - belabberd click to hear 2 ('pretty bad.')
Tot ziens click to hear is the best all-purpose 'goodbye' and 'see you,' but it is a bit formal. With a more specific meaning you could say (as I already mentioned above) tot zo click to hear 2 ('see you in a moment') - tot straks click to hear 2 ('see you later') - tot vanmiddag click to hear ('see you this afternoon') - tot vanavond click to hear ('see you this evening') - Tot morgen click to hear 2 ('see you tomorrow') or tot maandag click to hear ('see you Monday.')
For 'goodbye' I can only think of the somewhat informal dag click to hear - which is often stretched out to da-ag click to hear - or even into a long goodbye dag - da-ag - dag hoor - nou, dag hoor click to hear 2. You may hear people say doei click to hear or doe-ie click to hear but I think it's a bit intimate. Originally from Groningen, but now a generally popular 'goodbye' is hoi click to hear or even moi click to hear. When I was a teenager, we said things like aju click to hear (from French 'adieu') - tabé click to hear (from Malay) or de mazzel! click to hear (from Hebrew 'mazzal,' luck) but those things went out of fashion.
I often say sterkte click to hear with a goodbye, it's like 'good luck.' Literally it means [wishing you] 'strength.'
I have the impression people in England and America don't say something like "Enjoy your meal" to the other people at the table, it's the waiter or waitress who says that; but in Holland, saying Eet smakelijk click to
      hear to your fellow eaters is very common.
When you thank someone whose job it is to help you, their 'you're welcome' may be: Tot Uw dienst! click to hear 2 ('at your service'?)

question vraag click to
      hear
answer antwoord click to
      hear
yes ja click to
      hear
no nee click to
      hear
maybe,
perhaps
misschien click to
      hear
Yes, please (polite)
Yes, please (informal)
Yes, please (informal)
Ja, alstublieft click to hear 2
Ja, alsjeblieft click to hear 2 3
Ja, graag click to hear 2
No, thank you (polite)
No, thank you (informal)
Nee, dank U click to hear 2
Nee, dank je click to hear 2
Alstublieft click to hear and alsjeblieft click to hear 2 are the magic word 'please,' but they're also said when you hand someone something, like 'here you are,' and sometimes they're said in reply to a 'thank you,' in the sense of 'you're welcome, my pleasure.'
Happy birthday!
Congratulations!
Many Congratulations!
Hartelijk gefeliciteerd met je verjaardag! click to
      hear - >>
Gefeliciteerd! click to hear 2
Hartelijk gefeliciteerd! click to hear
Merry Christmas and A Happy New Year!
Merry Christmas!
Blessed Christmas!
Happy Year's End!
Happy New Year's Eve and New Year's Day
Happy New Year!
Happy Easter!
Blessed Easter!
Happy Holidays!
Prettige Kerstdagen en Een Gelukkig Nieuwjaar! click to hear 2
Prettige Kerstdagen! click to hear 2 - >>
Zalig Kerstfeest! click to hear 2 (said by Roman Catholics)
Zalig Uiteinde! click to hear 2 (jocular and among Catholics)
Prettige Jaarwisseling! click to hear 2 3
Gelukkig Nieuwjaar! click to hear - >>
Prettige Paasdagen! click to hear - >>
Zalig Pasen! click to hear 2 3 (said by Roman Catholics)
Prettige Feestdagen! click to hear 2
The food was delicious 't Eten was heerlijk click to hear - >>
I'm sorry, I forgot your name 't Spijt me, ik ben Uw naam vergeten click to hear 2
In a shop >> a sales person may ask you:
or shorter:
receipt
or about a plastic bag for your purchase:
a plastic bag
or: a small paper bag
Wilt U een bonnetje? click to hear 2 3 ('Would you like a receipt?')
Bonnetje mee? click to hear 2 3 ('The receipt along with it?')
bonnetje click to hear
Tasje d'r bij? click to hear 2 (A plastic bag with it?)
tasje click to hear
zakje click to hear 2
You can answer: Yes, Please
or: No, thank you
or with more emphasis: I don't need a receipt
Ja, graag click to hear 2
Nee, dank U click to hear 2
Ik hoef geen bonnetje click to hear 2
You may also need these lines:
I don't speak Dutch
Unfortunately, I don't speak Dutch
(But I do hope you'll learn Dutch and won't need these two phrases for long)
Ik spreek geen Nederlands click to hear 2
Ik spreek helaas geen Nederlands click to hear 2

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- Time - Jobs and Work - The Senses - Sayings and Idiom
Further Study: Basic Dutch Words - Pictures Dictionary - Easy Dutch - Lessons - Pronunciation - Listening - Reading - Grammar

Chris Tunnell suggested a few additional lines

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Don't be a dief (thief) / dievegge (female thief) - diefstal (theft) - stelen (to steal) - heler (dealer in stolen goods) - hear Dutch - 2