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Dutch Everyday: Trees

[a leaf]
blad click to hear
[leaves]
bladeren click to hear
[small leaves]
blaadjes click to hear - 2
[Fall changing of the colors]
herfstkleuren click to hear - 2
[fallen leaves]
dode bladeren click to hear
[small branch]
takje click to hear
[branch]
tak click to hear
[tree]
boom click to hear
[small tree]
boompje click to hear
[small tree]
boompje
[trees]
bomen click to hear
[trees]
bomen click to hear
[tree trunk]
boomstam click to hear
[tree trunk]
boomstam click to hear
[tree stump]
boomstronk click to hear
[roots]
wortels click to hear
[roots]
wortels click to hear
[forest]
bos click to hear
[jungle]
oerwoud click to hear - 2 - 3
[jungle]
oerwoud click to hear - 2 - 3
de / het / 't click to hear (the)
een, 'n click to hear - 2 (a, an)
één click to hear (one)
>>
(het) blad
(het) blaadje
(de) bladeren
hear
(leaf)
(small leaf)
(leaves)
(de) tak
(de) boomstam
(de) boomstronk
(de) wortel
hear - 2
(branch)
(tree trunk)
(tree stump)
(root)
(de) boom
(het) bos
(het) woud
hear
(tree)
(forest)
(deep, vast forest)

Blad click to
  hear ('leaf') has the irregular plural: bladeren click to
  hear ('leaves') - irregular both in the lengthening of the vowel and in the -eren ending.
The diminutive blaadje click to
  hear ('small leaf') also has that lengthened vowel.
You could also say, poetically (or rough): blâren click to
  hear ('leaves') though that word (written without the accent circonflexe) also means 'blisters.'
Dode bladeren click to
  hear, dooie blâren click to
  hear ('[dead] fallen leaves.')

Boom click to
  hear ('tree') is written with two O's, while the plural bomen click to
  hear ('trees') has only one O: but the sound is the same ("long O.")
The Dutch spelling rules are fairly straightforward, mostly consistent, and not difficult.
A double vowel is always long:
boom click to
  hear ('tree') - maan click to
  hear - 2 ('moon')
A single vowel will be long in an open syllable (ending in a vowel):
stro click to
  hear - 2 ('straw') - ma click to
  hear - 2 ('mom')
A single vowel will be short in a closed syllable (ending in a consonant):
bom click to
  hear - 2 ('bomb') - man click to
  hear - 2 ('man')
If there is only one (1) consonant between vowels when a word (or part of a word) is split up in syllables,
that consonant almost always goes to the second syllable, leaving the first syllable open with a long vowel:
bomen: bo-men click to
  hear ('trees') - manen: ma-nen click to
  hear - 2 ('moons')
If there are two or more consonants between vowels when a word (or part of a word) is split up in syllables,
then usually one of those consonants remains with the first syllable, and makes it a closed syllable with a short vowel:
bommen: bom-men click to
  hear - 2 ('bombs') - mannen: man-nen click to
  hear - 2 ('men').
fully explained.

[family tree]
stamboom click to hear >>
Woud click to
  hear - 2 is a vast, deep forest, like: Het Zwarte Woud click to
  hear - 2 ('The Black Forest.')
Very large trees are sometimes called woudreuzen click to
  hear - 2 ('giants of the forest.')
Oerwoud click to
  hear - 2 - 3 ('jungle') is literally 'primeval forest.'
Wortels click to
  hear ('roots') is also the common word for 'carrots.'
Boomschors click to
  hear ('tree bark.') Also: bast click to
  hear
Note that boomstronk click to
  hear is 'tree stump,' while boomstam click to
  hear is 'tree trunk.'
(de) kurk click to hear is the bottle stopper 'cork,' while het kurk click to hear is the tree bark those stoppers are made from
[wine bottle cork]
kurk click to hear
[fir tree]
dennenboom click to hear
[a Christmas tree]
kerstboom click to hear
[pine needles]
dennennaalden click to hear
[pinecone]
dennenappel click to hear
[pineapple]
ananas click to hear
'Pineapple' is ananas click to hear in Dutch; there is an old-fashioned word pijnappel click to hear for 'pinecone,' but the common word is dennenappel click to hear 2. A related (and also old-fashioned) word is pijnappelklier click to hear 2 ('pineal gland.')
[blossom, bloom]
bloesem click to hear
[oak leaf]
eikenblad click to hear
[acorns]
eikels click to hear
[chestnuts]
kastanjes click to hear 2
[wood, lumber, timber]
hout click to hear - timmerhout click to hear
[knot in wood]
knoest click to hear
[a wooden stool]
het houten krukje
- het krukje is van hout click to hear
[clogs, the Dutch wooden shoes]
de houten klompen
- de klompen zijn van hout click to hear

[a wooden spoon]
de houten lepel
- de lepel is van hout click to hear

[laminated board, <5 layers]
multiplex click to hear 2
[laminated board, 3 layers]
triplex click to hear 2
(de) timmerman click to hear 2 'carpenter'
(de) houthakker click to hear 2 ['woodchopper']
'lumberjack, logger'

(de) boom click to hear 2 tree
bomen click to hear trees
A Few Common Trees
eik click to hear oak
beuk click to hear beech
berk click to hear 2 birch
iep click to hear 2 elm
(old-fashioned:) olm click to hear 2 elm
es click to hear 2 ash
esdoorn click to hear maple
els click to hear alder
populier click to hear poplar
linde click to hear 2 linden (lime?)
wilg click to hear willow
treurwilg click to hear weeping willow
den click to
 hear
dennenboom click to hear
pine tree
pine tree
spar click to hear 2 spruce
ceder click to hear cedar
tulpenboom click to hear
= magnolia click to hear 2
tulips tree >>
= magnolia
*
kastanje click to
 hear
kastanjeboom click to hear 2
chestnut (both nut and tree)
chestnut tree
appelboom click to hear 2 apple tree
perenboom click to hear 2 pear tree
kersenboom click to hear 2 cherry tree
pruimenboom click to hear plum tree
notenboom click to hear walnut tree

spaanplaat click to hear particle board

[A collection of tools]
tools
[A Dutch flag on the edge of a puddle of water]
colors
[grapes]
food
[a house]
the house
[books]
media
[jacket]
clothing
[a mirror]
beauty
[glasses, watch, etc.]
necessities

>>

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Don't be a dief (thief) / dievegge (female thief) - diefstal (theft) - stelen (to steal) - heler (dealer in stolen goods) - hear Dutch - 2